Influence
April 2, 2024

Primary Care Interventions to Prevent Child Maltreatment: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

Sarah Wiehe, MD

Published in Journal of the American Medical Association. Here is a link to the article.

Regenstrief Institute author: Sarah Wiehe, MD, MPH.

Abstract
Importance: Child maltreatment, which includes child abuse and neglect, can have profound effects on health, development, survival, and well-being throughout childhood and adulthood. The prevalence of child maltreatment in the US is uncertain and likely underestimated. In 2021, an estimated 600 000 children were identified by Child Protective Services as experiencing abuse or neglect and an estimated 1820 children died of abuse and neglect.

Objective: The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a systematic review to evaluate benefits and harms of primary care-feasible or referable behavioral counseling interventions to prevent child maltreatment in children and adolescents younger than 18 years without signs or symptoms of maltreatment.

Population: Children and adolescents younger than 18 years who do not have signs or symptoms of or known exposure to maltreatment.

Evidence assessment: The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to determine the balance of benefits and harms of primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment in children and adolescents younger than 18 years without signs or symptoms of or known exposure to maltreatment.

Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment. (I statement).

Authors
US Preventive Services Task Force; Michael J Barry 1, Wanda K Nicholson 2, Michael Silverstein 3, David Chelmow 4, Tumaini Rucker Coker 5, Esa M Davis 6, Carlos Roberto Jaén 7, M Tonette Krousel-Wood 8, Sei Lee 9, Li Li 10, Goutham Rao 11, John M Ruiz 12, James J Stevermer 13, Joel Tsevat 7, Sandra Millon Underwood 14, Sarah Wiehe 15

Affiliations

1Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
2George Washington University, Washington, DC.
3Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.
4Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.
5University of Washington, Seattle.
6University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore.
7University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.
8Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.
9University of California, San Francisco.
10University of Virginia, Charlottesville.
11Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
12University of Arizona, Tucson.
13University of Missouri, Columbia.
14University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
15Indiana University, Bloomington.1Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

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