News
February 5, 2019

Regenstrief Scientist Says African Americans Have Higher Rate of Alzheimer’s Disease, Quoted in USA Today

Regenstrief Scientist Says African Americans Have Higher Rate of Alzheimer’s Disease, Quoted in USA Today

Daniel Bateman, M.D., says a number of studies show a higher rate of Alzheimer’s disease in African Americans. He told USA Today there are some hypotheses to explain this.

“There are higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, heart disease and diabetes in African Americans compared to whites. All of those are risk factors for Alzheimer’s and dementia,” said Dr. Bateman. He points to a 2018 study, which also looked at a number of factors of people who have had a stroke, that found that African Americans had an increased rate for all five types of dementia.

Joanne Pike, vice president of programs for the Alzheimer’s Association in Chicago, says that African Americans are twice as likely to have Alzheimer’s, less likely to receive a diagnosis and more likely to be diagnosed in later stages of the disease. Researchers are looking at many avenues to understand the reasons why.

Regenstrief Institute does a large amount of work in the area of Alzheimer’s and dementia. From testing new care models to decision support and the effects of medication on the brain.  Dr. Bateman’s work is focused on Alzheimer’s disease, specifically innovative approaches to measure and treat behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia by leveraging technologies. He serves as a co-investigator on the Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center (IADC) Outreach and Recruitment (OR) Core and contributes to the IADC Clinical Core.

Read the USA Today article featuring Dr. Bateman here.

  • Daniel Bateman

Related News

Dawn Bravata, MD

COVID did not affect stroke patient care quality or outcomes in nation’s largest healthcare system

In one of the first studies to investigate the overall quality of care and outcomes of stroke care for

Richard Holden and Noll Campbell

Helping the Helpers: Leveraging information technology to support caregiver medication management for the millions of individuals who live with dementia

Innovative methodology involves caregivers as co-designers not simply informants and includes virtual component More than 21 million people provide

Thankham Thyvalikakath

Linking medical and dental records in health information exchanges could improve dental patient safety, preventive care, and treatment outcomes

New $2.4 million NIH award supports efforts to go beyond current inefficient, paper-based approach to data sharing Dental professionals

karen crow

Experienced financial executive named Regenstrief Institute CFO

INDIANAPOLIS – Karen Crow, a veteran financial executive and consultant with more than 30 years of experience, will join