Daniel Bateman, M.D., says a number of studies show a higher rate of Alzheimer’s disease in African Americans. He told USA Today there are some hypotheses to explain this.

“There are higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, heart disease and diabetes in African Americans compared to whites. All of those are risk factors for Alzheimer’s and dementia,” said Dr. Bateman. He points to a 2018 study, which also looked at a number of factors of people who have had a stroke, that found that African Americans had an increased rate for all five types of dementia.

Joanne Pike, vice president of programs for the Alzheimer’s Association in Chicago, says that African Americans are twice as likely to have Alzheimer’s, less likely to receive a diagnosis and more likely to be diagnosed in later stages of the disease. Researchers are looking at many avenues to understand the reasons why.

Regenstrief Institute does a large amount of work in the area of Alzheimer’s and dementia. From testing new care models to decision support and the effects of medication on the brain.  Dr. Bateman’s work is focused on Alzheimer’s disease, specifically innovative approaches to measure and treat behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia by leveraging technologies. He serves as a co-investigator on the Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center (IADC) Outreach and Recruitment (OR) Core and contributes to the IADC Clinical Core.

Read the USA Today article featuring Dr. Bateman here.

MEDIA CONTACT:

John Erickson
Regenstrief Institute
jorerick@regenstrief.org
(317) 274-9062

Related News

Oct 16, 2019 • News
Regenstrief leaders to deliver keynote addresses at data workshop in South America
Two of Regenstrief Institute’s leaders are sharing their expertise in artificial intelligence and data infrastructure at a workshop hosted by Brazil’s National Institute of Science and Technology in Scientific Assisted Medicine in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Regenstrief’s Vice President for Research, Eneida Mendonca, M.D., PhD, will speak Thursday, Oct. 17 and Friday, Oct. 18, about the…
Continue Reading >
Oct 15, 2019 • News
Acceptance and commitment therapy may ease fear of recurrence in cancer survivors
Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) shows promise for treating fear of cancer recurrence in women who have survived breast cancer. The first of its kind study by researchers from Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University, Butler University and West Virginia University School of Medicine, published in Cancer, found that cancer survivors who received ACT showed significantly larger…
Continue Reading >