Influence
December 2, 2021

First study to qualitatively describe primary care provider experience with chronic cough

First study to qualitatively describe primary care provider experience with chronic cough

Regenstrief Institute and Merck & Co., Inc. conducted the first study to qualitatively describe primary care providers’ experience evaluating and treating chronic cough.

Chronic cough affects 10 percent of adults and is one of the most common reasons for primary care visits. Researchers surveyed 15 providers on their definition of chronic cough, how they evaluate the condition and look for causes, how they decide which treatment approach to take, and how they continue to manage the condition.

The study revealed a lack of knowledge and low use of guidelines related to chronic cough. Instead, providers relied on experience and education from residency training. Participants expressed confidence in identifying the cause, but uncertainty about the exact definition of chronic cough. Participants wanted additional resources for treatment, including better access to specialists and testing.

The authors suggest that future research focus on the use of chronic cough guidelines among a larger group of providers, as well as how better access to or coordination with specialists might help patients.

Regenstrief Institute and Merck have been working on a number of chronic cough projects, including an effort to use natural language processing to identify patients with the condition to enhance research.

Management of Chronic Cough in Adult Primary Care: A Qualitative Study” is published as a letter to the editor in Lung. The research was supported by Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA.

Authors from Regenstrief are Taylor Gowan; Monica Huffman; Michael Weiner, M.D., MPH; Tasneem L. Talib, PhD, M.S.; Ashley Griffith and Paul Dexter, M.D. Authors from Merck are Jonathan Schelfhout, PhD; Jessica Weaver, PhD, MPH; Ishita Doshi, MPH and Vishal Bali, PhD.

Related News

Redesigning diabetes technology to detect low blood sugar in older adults with diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease

Redesigning diabetes technology to detect low blood sugar in older adults with diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease

Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist April Savoy, PhD, a human factors engineer and health services researcher, is developing and testing

illustration of digestive tract with magnifier and stool sample container

New study provides evidence for three-year interval for multi-target stool DNA screening for those at average risk of colon cancer

A scientific study exploring the appropriate interval for colorectal cancer screening via non-invasive multi-target stool DNA testing for individuals

Dr. Tom Imperiale on tailoring colonoscopy screening for 45- to 49-year-olds

Dr. Tom Imperiale on tailoring colonoscopy screening for 45- to 49-year-olds

Dr. Tom Imperiale explains why physicians should be good stewards of colonoscopy resources.  [button_links href=”https://www.regenstrief.org/article/regenstrief-researcher-calls-for-tailoring-colorectal-cancer-screening-45-49-year-olds/” title=”Read the full

Drs. David Haggstrom and Eric Vachon: Personal Health Records for Cancer Survivors

Drs. David Haggstrom and Eric Vachon: Personal Health Records for Cancer Survivors

Dr. David Haggstrom, MD, MAS, and Dr. Eric Vachon, PhD, RN, discuss their feasibility study that showed implementing a