Influence
April 18, 2022

Research from Regenstrief gastroenterologist makes impact; article recognized by professional journal as 1 of most widely cited for 2020-2021

Research from Regenstrief gastroenterologist makes impact; article recognized by professional journal as 1 of most widely cited for 2020-2021

Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Thomas Imperiale, M.D., is being recognized by the American Association for Cancer Research for an impactful paper. His article Specificity of the Multi-Target Stool DNA Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening in Average-Risk 45-49 Year-Olds: A Cross-Sectional Study” was one of the most highly cited papers in the Journal of Cancer Prevention Research during 2020 and 2021.  

The study examined the performance of multitarget stool DNA tests in individuals aged 45 to 49 at average risk for colon cancer. Results indicated that the tests have high specificity and support their use as a noninvasive option for colorectal cancer screening. This article provided a foundation for numerous other scientists to advance research in this area.  

Dr. Imperiale focuses much of his research on screening and surveillance for colorectal cancer, including tailoring each for individual patient risk. He recently worked with a research team to develop and test a new tool to predict personal risk for advanced precancerous polyps and colon cancer.  

The American Association for Cancer Research journals highlighted Dr. Imperiale’s paper during the organization’s annual conference in April 2022.  

In addition to his role as a research scientist at Regenstrief Institute, Dr. Imperiale is a core investigator for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Center for Health Information and Communication, Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center. He is the Lawrence Lumeng Professor of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Indiana University School of Medicine as well.   

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