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Intensive care unit behind closed glass door

Admission to the hospital and critical illness can have a lasting impact on the lives of people who survive, especially those in need of life support. During the COVID-19 pandemic, many people admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for the virus are treated with mechanical ventilators and sedatives, which increase the risk of delirium, a type of brain failure, and post-intensive care syndrome. Post intensive care syndrome impairs the recovery of patients for up to two years after hospitalization, causing mental health, physical, quality of life and cognitive problems.

Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University researchers are working to understand how many COVID-19 survivors are dealing with delirium-related distress and post-intensive care syndrome following their recovery. To accomplish this, the team has created a survey to gather information on symptoms that people experienced during their illness and treatment, how they are recovering, and what they are thinking and feeling during their recovery.

The data gathered will provide an understanding of how many survivors are dealing with delirium-related distress and give insight into how they are coping with the stress of being treated in the ICU. Through this information, the study team hopes to understand what COVID-19 survivors need to recover.

The project is being led by Heidi Lindroth, PhD, R.N., a postdoctoral fellow at Regenstrief and Indiana University School of Medicine, and Sikandar Khan, D.O., M.S., a scientist at IU Center for Aging Research at Regenstrief Institute and an assistant professor of medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine. Other members of the team include Babar Khan, M.D., M.S., and Malaz Boustani, M.D., MPH of Regenstrief and IU School of Medicine and Jill Conners, PhD, and Sophia Wang, M.D. of IU School of Medicine.

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About Regenstrief Institute

Founded in 1969 in Indianapolis, the Regenstrief Institute is a local, national and global leader dedicated to a world where better information empowers people to end disease and realize true health. A key research partner to Indiana University, Regenstrief and its researchers are responsible for a growing number of major healthcare innovations and studies. Examples range from the development of global health information technology standards that enable the use and interoperability of electronic health records to improving patient-physician communications, to creating models of care that inform practice and improve the lives of patients around the globe.

Regenstrief Institute is celebrating 50 years of healthcare innovation. Sam Regenstrief, a successful entrepreneur from Connersville, Indiana, founded the institute with the goal of making healthcare more efficient and accessible for everyone. His vision continues to guide the institute’s research mission.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:
John Erickson
Regenstrief Institute
prteam@regenstrief.org
(317) 643-2313
Cindy Fox Aisen
Regenstrief Institute
caisen@regenstrief.org
(317) 843-2275

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